Discretionary Behavior: An Islamic Perspective

  • Osama HazziEmail author
  • Musab Hamod
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-31816-5_3789-1

Synonyms

Definition

From an organizational standpoint, discretionary behavior is defined as the behavior that is not prescribed as part of one’s organizational role, and that contributes in the aggregate to enhancing the welfare of the organization and its members. From an Islamic standpoint, discretionary behavior is defined as the behavior that is originally innate, but it is learnable over the time.

The Essence of Discretionary Behavior

Discretionary behavior has been studied in the organizational behavior field with a number of overlapping and related constructs such as helping behavior, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), personal initiative, proactive work behavior, prosocial organizational behavior and volunteering behavior. Considerable attention was devoted to some of such behaviors by a number of behavioral and social scientists during the 1980s and later (e.g., Brief and Motowidlo 1986; Smith et al. 1983...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.FrontiersTodayViennaAustria
  2. 2.Damascus UniversityDamascusSyria