Identity Politics in Uganda

  • Pius GumisirizaEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-31816-5_3784-1

Synonyms

Definitions

Identity politics is a very slippery term that has been used to describe different sorts of things over time (see Brunt 1989). In this entry, identity politics is defined as the use of self-defining psychocultural constructs that give meaning to people’s life such as race, religion, and ethnicity to acquire and exercise political power in Uganda (see Bernstein 2005). Uganda is an East African country, was colonized by the British, and got independence in 1962. The country has around 40 million people with a mixture of religions and ethnicities. From the time of it’s founding as a country in 1890 to present time, identities such as race, religion, and ethnicity have been politicized to achieve political and economic advantage in Uganda.

Introduction

The main narrative pursued in this discussion is that while colonialism significantly contributed toward the creation of...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Adhola Y (2013, April 14) Politics of identity and UPC in Ankole. Daily Monitor Kampala. Retrieved from www.dailymonitor.co.ug on 26 Sept 2018
  2. Aidan S (2011) The weight of history: ethnic identity and colonial rule in Uganda. Think Africa Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  3. Apter ED (1997) The political kingdom in Uganda: a study in bureaucratic nationalism. Frank Cass, London. Retrieved from https://books.google.co.ug/books?isbn=0714642347 on 20 Sept 2018Google Scholar
  4. Bernstein M (2005) Identity politics. Annu Rev Sociol 31:47–74. Accessed from http://www.jstor.org/stable/29737711 on 24 Sept 2018CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Brunt R (1989) The politics of identity in S. Hall and M. Jacques, New Times: the changing face of politics in the 1990s. Lawrence & Wishart, London, pp 150–159. Accessed from Google Scholar on 22 Sept 2018Google Scholar
  6. Bukenya B, Muhumuza W (2017) The politics of core public sector reform in Uganda: behind the facade. Working paper no. 85, Effective States and Inclusive Development Research Centre (ESID), University of Manchester, UK. Retrieved from https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2954595 on 15 Sept 2018
  7. Glentworth G, Hancock I (1973) Obote and Amin: continuity and change in modern Uganda politics. Afr Aff 72:237–255. Retrieved from https://www.jstor.org/stable/719846 on 24 Sept 2018CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Golooba-Mutebi F, Hickey S (2013) Investigating the links between political settlements and inclusive development in Uganda: towards a research agenda. Effective States and Inclusive Development Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester. Working paper no. 20. Retrieved from http://www.effective-states.org/wp-content/uploads/working_papers/final-pdfs/esid_wp_20_goloobamutebi-hickey.pdf on 26 Sept 2018
  9. Hansen HB (1977) Ethnicity and military rule in Uganda: a study of ethnicity as a political factor in Uganda. Scandinavian Institute of African Studies, Uppsala. Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com/Ethnicity-military-rule-Uganda-anthropology/dp/9171061223 on 25 Sept 2018Google Scholar
  10. Ingham K (1994) Obote: a political biography. Routledge, London. Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com/Obote-Political-Biography-Kenneth-Ingham/dp/0415053420 on 20 Sept 2018Google Scholar
  11. Kanyeihamba GW (2002) Constitutional and political history of Uganda. Centenary Publishers Kampala. Retrieved from https://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/5333474 on 20 Sept 2018
  12. Kiwanuka MSM (1970) Nationality and nationalism in Africa: the Uganda case. Can J Afr Aff 4:229–247Google Scholar
  13. Lindemann S (2010) Exclusionary elite bargains and civil war onset: the case of Uganda, Crisis States working papers series 2, 76. Crisis States Research Centre, LondonGoogle Scholar
  14. Lofchie FM (1972) The Uganda coup-class action by the military. J Mod Afr Stud 10:19–35.  https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022278X00022072CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Lubega H (2013, July 21) Could Obote have stopped his second fall? Daily Monitor Kampala. Retrieved from http://www.monitor.co.ug/Magazines/PeoplePower/Could-Obote-have-stopped-his-second-fall-/689844-1920988-46c91g/index.html on 25 Sept 2018
  16. Mamdani M (1983) Imperialism and fascism in Uganda. Heinemann Educational Books, Nairobi. Retrieved from https://libcom.org/files/ZZ_Mahmood%20Mamdani-Imperialism%20and%20Fascism%20in%20Uganda-Heinemann%20Educational%20Books%20(1983).pdf on 21 Sept 2018Google Scholar
  17. Mamdani M (2013) Define and rule: Natives as political identity, MISR book Series No 2. Retrieved from https://misr.mak.ac.ug/.../define-and-rule-native-as-political-identity-by-mahmood-mahmood on 12 Sept 2018
  18. Mudoola D (1996) Religion, ethnicity and politics in Uganda. Fountain Publishers, Kampala. Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com/Religion-ethnicity-politics-Uganda-Mudoola/dp/9970020137 on 21 Sept 2018Google Scholar
  19. Muteesa E II (1967) Desecration of my kingdom. Constable, London. Retrieved from www.worldcat.org/title/desecration-of-my-kingdom/oclc/381718 on 16 Sept 2018Google Scholar
  20. Mutibwa P (1992) Uganda since independence: a study of unfulfilled hopes. Fountain Publishers, Kampala. Retrieved from https://www.amazon.com/Uganda-Since-Independence-Story-Unfulfilled/dp/0865433577 on 17 Sept 2018Google Scholar
  21. Ramchandani R (1973) The economic roots of racial friction in Uganda. Econ Polit Wkly 8:2301+2303–2304Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Public Policy and GovernanceUganda Management InstituteKampalaUganda