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Neonatology pp 759-773 | Cite as

Neonatal Pulmonary Physiology of Term and Preterm Newborns

  • Corrado Moretti
  • Paola Papoff
Reference work entry

Abstract

A knowledge of normal neonatal pulmonary development and physiology is the cornerstone for understanding the pathophysiology and optimizing the treatment of many respiratory diseases of preterm and term infants. It forms the groundwork not only for an individualized treatment but also for increasing respiratory care technology, both important factors in improving pulmonary outcomes in these vulnerable patients. Pulmonary physiology and oxygen transport in the neonate are similar to older children; however, there are critical differences that are important to take into consideration when treating the youngest age group, and this chapter deals with the peculiar characteristics of neonatal respiratory mechanics and the pathophysiology of the various possible causes of hypoxia.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Università degli Studi di Roma “La Sapienza”RomeItaly
  2. 2.Intensive Care Unit, Sapienza University of RomeRomeItaly

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