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Neonatology pp 279-289 | Cite as

Organization of Perinatal Care: Training of Doctors and Nurses

  • Neil Marlow
Reference work entry

Abstract

Medical and nursing care for the newborn is organized differently in different health systems. Whereas general support in terms of screening and routine care is provided for a large number of babies in a maternity setting, in comparison neonatal intensive care for sick and immature babies is a low throughput but high cost service. Increasing medical costs and difficulty in staffing intensive care services make it important to evaluate the organization of neonatal care, and new data on the relationship between throughput and outcome are driving centralization of care for the smallest and sickest children. In this chapter, the elements of service organization are described.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Women’s HealthUniversity College LondonLondonUK

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