Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences

Living Edition
| Editors: Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Todd K. Shackelford

Time Management

  • Betsi LittleEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_871-1

Synonyms

Definition

“Behaviors that aim at achieving an effective use of time while performing certain goal-directed activities,” (Claessens et al. 2007, p. 262). The definition of time does not focus on time itself; rather it emphasizes behaviors that are goal-directed, to be accomplished within a frame of time or through the efficient use of time.

Introduction

Time management has been defined in many ways; however, in a literature review conducted by Claessens et al. (2007), these definitions have been summarized by defining time management as “behaviors that aim at achieving an effective use of time while performing certain goal-directed activities,” (p. 262). In this way, the definition of time does not focus on time itself; rather it emphasizes behaviors that are goal-directed, to be accomplished within a frame of time or through the efficient use of time.

Time Assessment

Time assessment is an awareness of the current passage of time as well as an estimation of...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Bandura, A. (1982). Self-efficacy mechanism in human agency. American Psychologist, 37, 122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. New York: WH Freeman/Times Books/Henry Holt & co.Google Scholar
  3. Bond, M. J., & Feather, N. T. (1988). Some correlates of structure and purpose in the use of time. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 55, 321–329.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Britton, B. K., & Tesser, A. (1991). Effects of time-management practices on college grades. Journal of Educational Psychology, 83(3), 405.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Claessens, B. J., Van Eerde, W., Rutte, C. G., & Roe, R. A. (2007). A review of the time management literature. Personnel Review, 36(2), 255–276.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Herrmann, D. J. (1984). Questionnaires about memory. In J. E. Harris & P. E. Morris (Eds.), Everyday memory. Actions and absent-mindedness (pp. 133–151). London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  7. Kaufman, C. F., Lane, P. M., & Lindquist, J. D. (1991). Time congruity in the organization: A prposed quality-of-life framework. Journal of Business and Psychology, 6(1), 79–106.Google Scholar
  8. Kuhl, J., & Fuhrmann, A. (1998). Decomposing self-regulation and self-control: The volitional components inventory. In J. Heckhausen & C. S. Dweck (Eds.), Motivation and self-regulation across the life span (pp. 15–49). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Macan, T. H., (1994). Time management: Test of a process model. Journal of applied psychology, 79(3), 381.Google Scholar
  10. Macan, T. H., (1996). Time-management training: Effects on time behaviors, attitudes, and job performance. The Journal of Psychology, 130(3), 229–236.Google Scholar
  11. Macan, T. H., Shahani, C., Dipboye, R. L., & Phillips, A. P. (1990). College students’ time management: Correlations with academic performance and stress. Journal of Educational Psychology, 82(4), 760–768.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Tripoli, A. M. (1998). Planning and allocating: Strategies for managing priorities in complex jobs. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, 7(4), 455–476.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Wratcher, M. A., & Jones, R. O. (1988). A time management workshop for adult learners. Journal of College Student Personnel, 27, 566–567.Google Scholar
  14. Zelinski, E. M., Gilewski, M. J., & Thompson, L. W. (1980). Do laboratory memory tests relate to everyday remembering and forgetting. In New directions in memory and aging: Proceedings of the George A. Tailand Memorial Conference (pp. 519–544).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National UniversityLa JollaUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Patrizia Velotti
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Educational SciencesUniversity of GenoaGenoaItaly
  2. 2.Sapienza University of RomeRomeItaly