Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences

Living Edition
| Editors: Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Todd K. Shackelford

Three-Factor Model of Personality

  • Chris J. JacksonEmail author
  • Man-Zung Fung
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_870-1

Synonyms

Introduction

Resolution of the overstated person-situation debate during the mid-1980s in favor of the stability of individual differences across contexts led to increased interest in personality research and application (e.g., Goldberg 1993; Matthews and Deary 1998). Developing ideas about the consistency of personality (e.g., Epstein 1983), increasing computing power, and improved psychological, psychometric, and statistical methodology (e.g., Kline 1993, 1994) gave researchers confidence in personality research as a science. While much research has focused on developing an agreed taxonomy of personality (Brody and Ehrlichman 1998; McCrae and Costa 1996), other research led to the development of psychobiological models (e.g., Gray and McNaughton 2000; Eysenck 1967; Zuckerman 1991), statistical and lexical models such as the Big Five (Digman 1990) and HEXACO (Ashton et al. 2004), socio-cognitive models...

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of ManagementUNSWSydneyAustralia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Patrizia Velotti
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Educational SciencesUniversity of GenoaGenoaItaly
  2. 2.Sapienza University of RomeRomeItaly