Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences

Living Edition
| Editors: Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Todd K. Shackelford

Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_45-1
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Synonyms

Definition

The Marlowe Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS) is a 33-item measure of individual-level social desirability bias, which was defined as the “need for subjects to respond in culturally sanctioned ways” (Crowne and Marlowe 1960, p. 354) and also “need for social approval” (Crowne and Marlowe 1964).

Introduction

The first measure of social desirability bias (SDB) was the Social Desirability Scale (SDS), developed by Edwards (1957) to distinguish between socially favorable responses and unbiased responses. However, Crowne and Marlowe (1960) found the SDS pathologically biased and inappropriate for respondents from the general population. To tackle this problem, a set of 50 items describing behaviors with no link to psychopathology was given to 10 judges including faculty members and graduate students to rate whether the items are socially desirable (Crowne and Marlowe 1960). In the final...

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References

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research and Evaluation Methodology ProgramCollege of Education, University of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Brendan Clark
    • 1
  1. 1.Wichita State UniversityWichitaUSA