Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences

Living Edition
| Editors: Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Todd K. Shackelford

Self-Knowledge

  • Henryk BukowskiEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_2004-1

Synonyms

Definition

Self-knowledge refers to the collection of representations believed to truly and accurately depict the Self. Like classic knowledge, Self-knowledge is acquired, stored, retrieved, and organized, and it conveys meaning and guidance on how to interact with the environment, in particular with other social beings. Unlike classic knowledge, Self-knowledge is not learnt from any textbooks or media but essentially from introspection and interactions. Importantly, Self-knowledge exists in many forms, such as knowledge of our past, our personality, or our life goals, and its accuracy is often difficult if not impossible to evaluate objectively.

Introduction

The scattered current state of the study of Self-knowledge can be attributed to the fact that various domains of psychology have focused on specific aspects of Self-knowledge, such as its domains of knowledge, the processes contributing to or influencing...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Social Perception Reasoning Interaction Neuroscience Group, Psychological Sciences Research InstituteUniversité catholique de LouvainLouvain-La-NeuveBelgium

Section editors and affiliations

  • Chris Ditzfeld
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA