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Convergence with the Arts

Living reference work entry
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Abstract

This chapter examines convergence in science and arts by considering two complementary trajectories over the last 25 years. First, it examines the institutional drivers behind convergence, from the perspective of governance and public value within science. Second, it explores convergence around the methodological practices of artists, which speaks to the complex political economy of knowledge generation, symbolic significance, and biomediated resistance. Finally, it considers the impact of convergence on the future of each area and what might be the opportunities and risks of further convergence.

Keywords

Bioart Science festival Biodesign Public engagement with science Science communication Bioethics Biopolitics 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Chair in Science Communication & Future Media, School of Environment & Life SciencesUniversity of Salford ManchesterUK

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