Encyclopedia of Renaissance Philosophy

Living Edition
| Editors: Marco Sgarbi

Foreknowledge in Renaissance Philosophy: Divine

  • Antonio GeraceEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-02848-4_1007-1

Abstract

This entry deals with the notion of God’s foreknowledge. First, Augustine’s position is delineated, after which follows that of Boethius, in order to introduce the theological and philosophical topics which characterized the later discussion on divine foreknowledge. Then, the focus will turn to Aquinas’ view. Augustine, Boethius, and Aquinas furnish the arguments necessary to comprehend the discussion of the early modern era, characterized by both the Catholic–Protestant debate and the inner-Catholic debate between Molinist and Augustinian-minded theologians. Therefore, attention will be paid to Calvin, while the last section will focus on Molina, who followed (and improved) Aquinas’ terminology in order to better rebut Reform-minded theologians, although his theses were harshly criticized by anti-Pelagian Catholics.

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References

Primary Literature

  1. Aquinas, Thomas. 2000. Commento alle sentenze di Pietro Lombardo. Bologna: Edizioni Studio Domenicano.Google Scholar
  2. Augustine. 1962. De Praedestinatione Sanctorum. BA 24.Google Scholar
  3. Augustine. 1970. De diversis quaestionibus ad Simplicianum, ed. Mutzenbecher (CCSL 44). Turnhout: Brepols.Google Scholar
  4. Calvin, J. 1962. Institutes of the christian religion. Trans. H. Beveridge. London: James Clarke.Google Scholar
  5. Molina, L. de. 1988. On divine foreknowledge (part IV of the Concordia), ed. A. J. Freddoso. Ithaca: Cornell.Google Scholar

Secondary Literature

  1. Craig, W. 1988. Divine foreknowledge and future contingents from Aristotle to Suárez. Leiden: Brill.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Gaskin, R. 1993. Conditionals of Freedom and Middle Knowledge. The Philosophical Quarterly 43: 412–430.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research Unit of History of Church and TheologyKU LeuvenLeuvenBelgium
  2. 2.Fondazione per le scienze religiose “Giovanni XXIII”BolognaItaly

Section editors and affiliations

  • Anna Laura Puliafito
    • 1
  1. 1.Universität BaselBaselSwitzerland