Skip to main content

Educationally Designed Game Environments and Feedback

Part of the Encyclopedia of Language and Education book series (ELE)

Abstract

This chapter addresses the potential of educationally designed game environments and in particular that of game-generated feedback for encouraging, through purposeful instructional design, learners’ engagement in the process of developing skills in a second or foreign language (L2). By reviewing the existing research literature, it fleshes out the idea that gameful feedback may be a powerful design element for engendering participant engagement in instructed L2 learning. We define “engagement in game-based CALL” as learner behavior that is typified by the following characteristics: (1) it is driven by intrinsic motivation; (2) it is focused primarily on language meaning and communicative use; and (3) it involves attention to linguistic form. The chapter reviews pioneer studies on gameful engagement in CALL, describes recent research that addresses the role of feedback in relation to designed engagement in CALL, and examines trends in work in progress such as gamification, as well as problems in current research. We conclude with challenges and directions for future research.

Keywords

  • Feedback
  • Online games
  • Mini-games
  • Engagement
  • Motivation
  • Computer-assisted language learning (CALL)

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-02237-6_28
  • Chapter length: 14 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   379.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-319-02237-6
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Hardcover Book
USD   499.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

References

  • Becker, K. (2007). Pedagogy in commercial video games. In M. Prensky, C. Aldrich, & D. Gibson (Eds.), Games and simulations in online learning: Research and development frameworks (pp. 21–47). Hershey: Information Science.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Cheung, A., & Harrison, C. (1992). Microcomputer adventure games and second language acquisition: A study of Hong Kong tertiary students. In M. C. Pennington & V. Stevens (Eds.), Computers in applied linguistics: An international perspective (pp. 155–178). Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cornillie, F., & Desmet, P. (2013). Seeking out fun failure: How positive failure feedback could enhance the instructional effectiveness of CALL mini-games. In Global perspectives on computer-assisted language learning. Proceedings of WorldCALL 2013 (pp. 64–68). University of Ulster. Retrieved from https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/p3853ngyb94dazq/ShortPapers.pdf

  • Cornillie, F., Clarebout, G., & Desmet, P. (2012a). Between learning and playing? Exploring learners’ perceptions of corrective feedback in an immersive game for English pragmatics. ReCALL, 24(3), 257–278. doi:10.1017/S0958344012000146.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Cornillie, F., Thorne, S. L., & Desmet, P. (2012b). Digital games for language learning: From hype to insight? ReCALL, 24(3), 243–256. doi:10.1017/S0958344012000134.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Cornillie, F., Van den Branden, K., & Desmet, P. (2015). From language play to linguistic form and back again. Lessons from an experimental study for the design of task-based language practice supported by games. In J. Colpaert, A. Aerts, M. Oberhofer, & M. Gutiérez-Colón Plana (Eds.), Proceedings of XVIIth international CALL conference. Task design and CALL. 6–8 July 2015. Tarragona, Spain (pp. 214–222). Antwerp: Universiteit Antwerpen.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ellis, R., Loewen, S., & Erlam, R. (2006). Implicit and explicit corrective feedback and the acquisition of L2 grammar. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 28(2), 339–368.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hattie, J., & Timperley, H. (2007). The power of feedback. Review of Educational Research, 77(1), 81–112. doi:10.3102/003465430298487.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Heift, T., & Schulze, M. (2015). Research timeline: Tutorial CALL. Language Teaching, 48(4), 1–20.

    Google Scholar 

  • Holden, C. L., & Sykes, J. M. (2011). Leveraging mobile games for place-based language learning. International Journal of Game-Based Learning, 1(2), 1–18.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hubbard, P. (2002). Interactive participatory dramas for language learning. Simulation & Gaming, 33(2), 210–216. Retrieved from http://sag.sagepub.com/cgi/reprint/33/2/210

  • Kuppens, A. H. (2010). Incidental foreign language acquisition from media exposure. Learning, Media and Technology, 35(1), 65–85. doi:10.1080/17439880903561876.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Larsen-Freeman, D. (2003). Teaching language. From grammar to grammaring. Boston: Thomson/Heinle.

    Google Scholar 

  • Laufer, B., & Hulstijn, J. H. (2001). Incidental vocabulary acquisition in a second language: The construct of task-induced involvement. Applied Linguistics, 22(1), 1–26. doi10.1093/applin/22.1.1.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Levy, M., Hubbard, P., Stockwell, G., & Colpaert, J. (2015). Research challenges in CALL. Computer Assisted Language Learning, 28(1), 1–6. doi:10.1080/09588221.2014.987035.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Li, S. (2010). The effectiveness of corrective feedback in SLA: A meta-analysis. Language Learning, 60(2), 309–365. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9922.2010.00561.x.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lyster, R., & Saito, K. (2010). Oral feedback in classroom SLA. A meta-analysis. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 32(02), 265–302. doi:10.1017/S0272263109990520.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Mackey, A., & Goo, J. (2007). Interaction research in SLA: A meta-analysis and research synthesis. In A. Mackey (Ed.), Conversational interaction in second language acquisition (pp. 407–452). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Peterson, M. (2010). Computerized games and simulations in computer-assisted language learning: A meta-analysis of research. Simulation & Gaming, 41(1), 72–93. doi:10.1177/1046878109355684.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Peterson, M. (2013). Computer games and language learning. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Phillips, M. K. (1986). Communicative language learning and the microcomputer. London: British Council.

    Google Scholar 

  • Phillips, M. K. (1987). Potential paradigms and possible problems for CALL. System, 15(3), 275–287.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Piirainen-Marsh, A., & Tainio, L. (2009). Other-repetition as a resource for participation in the activity of playing a video game. Modern Language Journal, 93(2), 153–169.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Purushotma, R., Thorne, S. L., & Wheatley, J. (2009). 10 Key Principles for Designing Video Games for Foreign Language Learning. Paper produced for the Open Language & Learning Games Project, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Retrieved from https://lingualgames.wordpress.com/article/10-key-principles-for-designing-video-27mkxqba7b13d-2/

  • Ravaja, N., Saari, T., Salminen, M., Laarni, J., & Kallinen, K. (2006). Phasic emotional reactions to video game events: A psychophysiological investigation. Media Psychology, 8(4), 343–367. doi:10.1207/s1532785xmep0804_2.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Reinders, H., & Wattana, S. (2014). Can I say something? The effects of digital gameplay on willingness to communicate. Language Learning & Technology, 18(2), 101–123.

    Google Scholar 

  • Reinhardt, J., & Sykes, J. M. (2014). Special issue commentary: Digital game and play activity in L2 teaching and learning. Language Learning & Technology, 18(2), 2–8.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ryan, R. M., Rigby, C. S., & Przybylski, A. K. (2006). The motivational pull of video games: A self-determination theory approach. Motivation and Emotion, 30(4), 344–360. doi:10.1007/s11031-006-9051-8.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Stanley, G. (2014). Using the IWB to support gamification in order to enhance writing fluency in the second language classroom. In E. Cutrim Schmid & S. Whyte (Eds.), Teaching languages with technology: Communicative approaches to interactive whiteboard use. A resource book for teacher development (pp. 152–187). New Delhi: Bloomsbury.

    Google Scholar 

  • Steinkuehler, C., & Duncan, S. (2008). Scientific habits of mind in virtual worlds. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 17(6), 530–543. doi:10.1007/s10956-008-9120-8.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Stevens, V. (1984a). Implications of research and theory concerning the influence of choice and control on the effectiveness of CALL. CALICO Journal, 2(1), 28–34.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stevens, V. (1984b). The effects of choice and control in computer-assisted language learning in teaching supplementary grammar to intermediate students of ESL and to remedial English students at the college entry level. TESOL Quarterly, 18(1), 141–143.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Stevens, V. (1991). Computer HANGMAN: Pedagogically sound or a waste of time? In Revised version of a paper presented at the 24th TESOL Convention, San Francisco, 6–10 Mar 1990. ERIC Document Reproduction Service.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sykes, J. M. (2009). Learner requests in Spanish: Examining the potential of multiuser virtual environments for L2 pragmatic acquisition. In L. Lomicka & G. Lord (Eds.), The next generation: Social networking and online collaboration in foreign language learning. Durham: Computer Assisted Language Instruction Consortium.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sykes, J. M., & Reinhardt, J. (2013). Language at play: Digital games in second and foreign language teaching and learning. New York: Pearson.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sykes, J. M., Oskoz, A., & Thorne, S. L. (2008). Web 2.0, synthetic immersive environments, and mobile resources for language education. CALICO Journal, 25(3), 528–546.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sylvén, L. K., & Sundqvist, P. (2012). Gaming as extramural English L2 learning and L2 proficiency among young learners. ReCALL, 24(03), 302–321. doi:10.1017/S095834401200016X.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Thorne, S. L. (2000). Beyond bounded activity systems: Heterogeneous cultures in instructional uses of persistent conversation. In Proceedings of the 33rd annual Hawaii international conference on system sciences (pp. 1–10). Los Alamitos: IEEE Computer Society.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thorne, S. L. (2008). Transcultural communication in open internet environments and massively multiplayer online games. In S. S. Magnan (Ed.), Mediating discourse online (pp. 305–327). Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Thorne, S. L., Fischer, I., & Lu, X. (2012). The semiotic ecology and linguistic complexity of an online game world. ReCALL, 24(03), 279–301. doi:10.1017/S0958344012000158.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Wells, G. (1981). Learning through interaction: The study of language development. New York: Cambridge University Press.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Young, R. (1988). Computer-assisted language learning conversations: Negotiating an outcome. CALICO Journal, 5(3), 65–83.

    Google Scholar 

  • Zheng, D., Newgarden, K., & Young, M. F. (2012). Multimodal analysis of language learning in world of Warcraft play: Languaging as values-realizing. ReCALL, 24(03), 339–360. doi:10.1017/S0958344012000183.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Frederik Cornillie .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2017 Springer International Publishing AG

About this entry

Cite this entry

Cornillie, F. (2017). Educationally Designed Game Environments and Feedback. In: Thorne, S., May, S. (eds) Language, Education and Technology. Encyclopedia of Language and Education. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-02237-6_28

Download citation