Encyclopedia of Sustainability in Higher Education

2019 Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho

Industrial Ecology and Sustainable Development

  • Svetlana GlobaEmail author
  • Viktoria Arnold
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-11352-0_389

Definition

Industrial ecology is a new view on environmental management for industry that transforms the industrial system to adapt its inputs and outputs to the concept of sustainable development and to bring it in circular economy. The main goal of IE is to move from linear to closed-loop system in all areas of human production and consumption (Lowe and Evans 1995).

Introduction

It is important to note that the industry has a very large impact on the environment around the world. To counteract this pernicious influence, the countries were united to implement the concept of sustainable development, the idea of which has already integrated almost in all spheres of human activity. January 1, 2016, entered into force the 17 Sustainable Development Goals for 15 years, adopted by the UN countries (as a part of the Agenda 2030 “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”). Goal 9 “Industrial innovation and infrastructure” should establish a strong infrastructure,...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Siberian Federal UniversityKrasnoyarskRussia
  2. 2.Brandenburg University of TechnologyCottbusGermany

Section editors and affiliations

  • Pinar Gökçin Özuyar
    • 1
  1. 1.Istinye UniversityIstanbulTurkey