Encyclopedia of Sustainability in Higher Education

2019 Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho

Intangible Assets and Sustainable Development

  • Tai Ming WutEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-11352-0_319

Synonyms

Definition

According to the World Commission on Environment and Development (1987), “sustainable development” means “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs” (World Commission on Environment and Development 1987). The definition makes an important assumption that humans are the subjects. In other words, the needs of the present human generation are met without compromising the future human generations’ needs. In short, sustainable development integrates the economic, social, and environmental objectives of society, in order to make human being better off without taking off the resources the people need in the future.

The definition in the previous paragraph has two dimensions: the idea of making life better (development) and sustainable (maintain). Bell and Morse (2003) said sustainable development is all about an improvement in the human condition.

Introduction...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Professional Education and Executive Development, College of Professional and Continuing EducationThe Hong Kong Polytechnic UniversityHong KongChina

Section editors and affiliations

  • Patrizia Lombardi
    • 1
  1. 1.Politecnico di TorinoTurinItaly