Encyclopedia of Sustainability in Higher Education

2019 Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho

Risk Management for Sustainable Development

  • Michelle Renk
  • Sônia Regina da Cal SeixasEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-11352-0_185

Definition

Sustainable development proposes that the needs of the present should be met without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (WCED 1987). To reach this premise, it is necessary to use risk management as a decision-making process associated with political, social, economic, and technical aspects and relevant risk assessment information, to select and implement regulatory responses appropriate to the specificity of the risk, including the stages of risk assessment, control, and monitoring (WHO 2004).

Introduction

The strong industrial and technological development of today’s society has produced several products and technologies that have contributed to the improvement of the quality of life and health and especially for the economic growth of several countries. However, this development has generated a multitude of socioenvironmental impacts, and risks follow from these activities that threaten both the economic growth and the environmental and...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Environmental Studies and Research, NEPAMState University of Campinas, UNICAMPCampinasBrazil

Section editors and affiliations

  • Evangelos Manolas
    • 1
  1. 1.Democritus University of ThraceThraceGreece