The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Victorian Women's Writing

Living Edition
| Editors: Lesa Scholl, Emily Morris

Yonge, Charlotte

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-02721-6_14-1

Definition

Charlotte M. Yonge (1823–1901) was a successful and prolific author who published well over a hundred books in her lifetime. She is perhaps best remembered now for her runaway bestseller, The Heir of Redclyffe (1853), and for “family chronicles” such as The Daisy Chain (1856) and The Pillars of the House (1872), which continued to be popular with younger readers well into the twentieth century. In addition to realist domestic fiction with a contemporary setting, she also published historical novels, biographies, devotional works, and a large number of educational books. For 40 years she edited and supplied much of the copy for a High Church periodical aimed at girls and young women, The Monthly Packet, in which she serialized many of her own novels. A devout Anglican, Yonge is strongly associated with the Tractarian Movement, of which her parish priest and close friend, John Keble, was a leading proponent. Her work is deeply imbued with her religious beliefs, and this may...

Keywords

Charlotte Yonge The Heir of Redclyffe The Daisy Chain The Monthly Packet John Keble Oxford Movement Tractarian Domestic realism Fiction 
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Battiscombe, Georgina. 1943. Charlotte Mary Yonge: The story of an uneventful life. London: Constable & Co.Google Scholar
  2. Coleridge, Christabel. 1903. Charlotte Mary Yonge. London: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  3. Hayter, Alethea. 1996. Charlotte Yonge. Plymouth: Northcote House.Google Scholar
  4. Juckett, Elizabeth C. 2009. Cross-gendering the underwoods: Christian subjection in Charlotte Yonge’s the pillars of the house. In Antifeminism and the Victorian novel: Rereading nineteenth-century women writers, ed. Tamara Wagner, 117–136. Amherst: Cambria Press.Google Scholar
  5. Sturrock, June. 1995. ‘Heaven and home’: Charlotte M. Yonge’s domestic fiction and the Victorian debate over women. Victoria: University of Victoria Press.Google Scholar
  6. Yonge, Charlotte. 1877. Womankind. London: Mozley.Google Scholar

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Trinity CollegeUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Emily Morris
    • 1
  1. 1.St. Thomas More College, University of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada