North, Marianne; Recollections of a Happy Life

  • Éadaoin AgnewEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-02721-6_109-1

Definition

Marianne North is best remembered for her extraordinary paintings housed in a permanent gallery in the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. She produced the predominantly botanical art during various solitary travels around the globe. She also penned three volumes of memoir outlining her many intrepid adventures, Recollections of a Happy Life: Being the Autobiography of Marianne North 2 vols. (1892) and Some Further Recollections of a Happy Life: Selected from the Journals of Marianne North Chiefly between the Years 1859–1869 (1893), which were posthumously edited by her sister Mrs. J. A. Symonds. The texts describe in detail North’s scientific curiosity and her environmental concerns, but her compassion rarely extends to the indigenous people she encounters. Thus, while she should be commended for her remarkable achievements as a Victorian woman, we must take into account her imperial attitude and the colonial ideology to which she contributed.

Life

Marianne North was born in...

Keywords

Autobiography Botanical art British Empire Colonialism Elizabeth Gaskell W. Botting Hemsley James Fergusson Sir Joseph Hooker Sir William Hooker Edward Lear Imperialism Life writing Marianne North Memoir North Gallery Natural sciences Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew Sir Edward Sabine John Addington Symonds Catherine Symonds Scientific imperialism Travel writing 
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References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kingston UniversityLondonUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Emily Morris
    • 1
  1. 1.St. Thomas More College, University of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada