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Travel Behavior and Demand Analysis and Prediction

  • Konstadinos G. Goulias
Reference work entry
Part of the Encyclopedia of Complexity and Systems Science Series book series (ECSSS)

Glossary

Activity-based approach

A modeling method that accounts for the interdependent relationships among activities and persons to derive travel demand equations.

Dynamic planning

The incorporation of trends, cycles, and feedback mechanisms into a process of actively shaping our future. Desired futures are first defined in terms of performance measures and a combination of forecasting and backcasting methods are used to identify the right paths to follow in achieving these futures.

Microsimulation

A method to represent the movement in space and time of the most elementary units of a phenomenon. When applied in traffic engineering the units are vehicles. When applied in travel behavior the units are persons and households. Multi-agent microsimulation allows to also represent human interaction with each person modeled as an agent.

Travel demand

The amount of travel within a time interval such as number of trips in a day, total amount of distance and total amount of travel time, the...

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag  2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Konstadinos G. Goulias
    • 1
  1. 1.University of California Santa BarbaraSanta BarbaraUSA

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