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Stochastic Cellular Automata as Models of Reaction–Diffusion Processes

  • Olga BandmanEmail author
Reference work entry
Part of the Encyclopedia of Complexity and Systems Science Series book series (ECSSS)

Glossary

This section contains definitions of basic SCA concepts and terms being used in publications, where SCA has been used and investigated.
Asynchronous mode of operation

Asynchronous mode of operation prescribes to perform the adjustment of any randomly chosen cell immediately, the global state adjustment being considered completed, when cell adjustment is done N times (N is the size of the CA).

Block–synchronous mode of operation

Block–synchronous mode of operation combines synchronous and asynchronous modes as follows. The cellular array is partitioned into subsets in such a way that the neighborhoods of any pair of cells in each subset do not intersect, which allows to adjust each subset of cells synchronously. Global CA state transition is performed by sequential synchronous subsets adjustments in the random order (asynchronously).

Operational mode

Operational mode determines the order of transition rules application to a choosen cell in accordance to asynchronous or...

Notes

Acknowledgments

The research is supported by the Presidium of Russian Academy of Science, Project N 15.6 (2017).

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Supercomputer Software DepartmentInstitute of Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Geophysics SB RASNovosibirskRussia

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