Encyclopedia of Database Systems

2018 Edition
| Editors: Ling Liu, M. Tamer Özsu

Opinion Mining

  • Bing Liu
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8265-9_257

Synonyms

Sentiment analysis

Definition

Given a set of evaluative text documents D that contain opinions (or sentiments) about an object, opinion mining aims to extract attributes and components of the object that have been commented on in each document dD and to determine whether the comments are positive, negative or neutral.

Historical Background

Textual information in the world can be broadly classified into two main categories, facts and opinions. Facts are objective statements about entities and events in the world. Opinions are subjective statements that reflect people’s sentiments or perceptions about the entities and events. Much of the existing research on text information processing has been (almost exclusively) focused on mining and retrieval of factual information, e.g., information retrieval, Web search, and many other text mining and natural language processing tasks. Little work has been done on the processing of opinions until only recently. Yet, opinions are so...

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Recommended Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Zheng Chen
    • 1
  1. 1.Microsoft Research AsiaMicrosoft CorporationBeijingChina