Encyclopedia of Database Systems

2018 Edition
| Editors: Ling Liu, M. Tamer Özsu

Path Query

  • Yuqing Wu
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8265-9_140

Synonyms

Document path query

Definition

Given a semi-structured data set D, a path query identifies nodes of interest by specifying the path lead to the nodes and the predicates associated with nodes along the path. The path is identified by specifying the labels of the nodes to be navigated and structural relationship (parent-child or ancestor-descendant) among the nodes. A predicate can be a path query itself, relative to the node that it is associated with.

Historical Background

Using path information in query processing has been studied in the object-oriented database systems, in which most queries require the traversing from one object to another following object identifiers, in the mid 1990s. The notion of path query, in which the path and predicates along the path are specified as the core of the query, became popular with the growth of the information on the web and the introduction of semi-structured data, especially XML.

Most of the popular query languages for querying XML...

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Recommended Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Indiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Frank Tompa
    • 1
  1. 1.David R. Cheriton School of Computer ScienceUniv. of WaterlooWaterlooCanada