Encyclopedia of Database Systems

2018 Edition
| Editors: Ling Liu, M. Tamer Özsu

Zooming Techniques

  • Harald Reiterer
  • Thorsten Büring
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8265-9_1128

Synonyms

Multiscale interface; Scaling; Zoomable user interface (ZUI)

Definition

Zooming facilitates data presentation on limited screen real-estate by allowing the users to alter the scale of the viewport such that it shows a decreasing fraction of the information space with an increasing magnification. Hence the system may first present a global overview of the information space for the benefit of orientation, and in a second step, the users can then dynamically re-allocate the screen space based on the information objects they are interested in. A navigation technique commonly used in conjunction with zooming is panning: a movement of the viewport over the information space at a constant scale.

Historical Background

The first application to use zooming as a fundamental interface approach was the Spatial Data Management System (SDMS) [ 1] in 1978 (see Fig.  1). The SDMS system relied heavily on custom hardware, including an octophonic sound system and an instrumented chair equipped...
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of KonstanzConstanceGermany
  2. 2.Ludwig-Maximilians-University MunichMunichGermany

Section editors and affiliations

  • Daniel A. Keim
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentUniversity of KonstanzKonstanzGermany