Encyclopedia of Systems and Control

Living Edition
| Editors: John Baillieul, Tariq Samad

Game Theory for Security

  • Tansu Alpcan
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-5102-9_37-1

Abstract

Game theory provides a mature mathematical foundation for making security decisions in a principled manner. Security games help formalizing security problems and decisions using quantitative models. The resulting analytical frameworks lead to better allocation of limited resources and result in more informed responses to security problems in complex systems and organizations. The game-theoretic approach to security is applicable to a wide variety of systems and critical infrastructures such as electricity, water, financial services, and communication networks.

Keywords

Security games Game theory Cyberphysical system security Complex systems 
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Electrical and Electronic EngineeringThe University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia