Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders

2013 Edition
| Editors: Fred R. Volkmar

Miller Assessment for Preschoolers (MAP)

  • Sarah SchoenEmail author
  • Lucy Miller
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1698-3_625

Synonyms

 MAP

Description

The Miller Assessment for Preschoolers is designed to evaluate the developmental status of children aged 2 years 9 months to 5 years 8 months across a broad range of areas including behavioral, motor, and cognitive functioning. The MAP test items are categorized into five performance indices. The foundations and coordination indices assess sensory motor abilities involving basic gross and fine motor tasks, awareness of sensations, and oral motor skills. The verbal and nonverbal indices assess cognitive skills required for language development, problem solving, memory, and perception. And the complex task performance index measures sensorimotor abilities in conjunction with cognitive abilities that require the interpretation of visual-spatial information. For children with severe developmental problems, the MAP can be used to provide a developmental overview and to clarify strengths and weaknesses. The MAP may be administered and scored by a wide range of...

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References and Readings

  1. Banus, B. J. (1983). The Miller assessment for preschoolers (MAP): An introduction and review. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 35, 333–340.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Daniels, L. E., & Bressler, S. (1990). The Miller assessment for preschoolers: Clinical use with children with developmental delays. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 44, 48–53.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. DeGangi, G. A. (1983). A critique of the standardization of the Miller assessment for preschoolers. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 37, 407–411.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Fulks, M. A., & Harris, S. R. (2005). Predictive accuracy of the Miller assessment for preschoolers in children with prenatal drug exposure. Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 25, 17–37.Google Scholar
  5. Leosdottir, T., Egilson, S. T., & Georgsdottir, I. (2005). Performance of extremely low birth weight children at 5 years of age on the Miller assessment for preschoolers. Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 25, 59–72.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Miller, L. J. (1987). Response to “A critique of the standardization of the Miller assessment for preschoolers”. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 41, 537–538.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Miller, L. J. (1988a). The Miller assessment for preschoolers. San Antonio, TX: Pearson.Google Scholar
  8. Miller, L. J. (1988b). Longitudinal validity of the Miller assessment for preschoolers. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 66, 811–814.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Parush, S., Winkur, M., Golstand, S., & Miller, L. J. (2002a). Long term predictive validity of the Miller assessment for preschoolers. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 94, 9221–9226.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Parush, S., Winkur, M., Golstand, S. M., & Miller, L. J. (2002b). Prediction of school performance using the Miller assessment for preschoolers: A validity study. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 56, 547–555.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Parush, S., Yochman, A., Jessel, A. S., Shapiro, M., & Mazor-Karsenty, T. (2002). Construct validity of the Miller assessment for preschoolers and the pediatric examination of educational readiness for children. Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, 22, 7–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Schneider, E., Parush, S., Katz, N., & Miller, L. J. (1995). Performance of Israeli versus US preschool children on the Miller assessment for preschoolers. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 49, 19–23.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sensory Processing Disorder FoundationRocky Mountain University of Health Professions, Provo UtahDenverUSA
  2. 2.Sensory Processing Disorder FoundationGreenwood VillageUSA