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Differential Reinforcement Procedures of Low Rates of Responding (DRL)

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Definition

Differential Reinforcement of Low Rates of responding (DRL) is a procedure in which the implementer can lower the rate of a response by reinforcing fewer incidents of that response or by reinforcing longer time intervals between incidents of the response. For example, if an individual rocks back and forth an average of 10 times per half hour, an interventionist could provide a positive reinforcer contingent upon that individual rocking 8 or fewer times per half hour. Alternatively, the interventionist could provide a reinforcer following a rocking incident if there had been a minimum amount of time (e.g., 5 min) since the previous rocking episode.

A related term is Differential Reinforcement of Diminishing rates (DRD). The technical difference between DRL and DRD is that in DRD, reinforcement follows a response that has been preceded by a minimum amount of time since the last response. DRL technically refers to providing reinforcement for fewer and fewer responses exhibited...

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Correspondence to Thomas Zane .

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Zane, T., Davis, C. (2013). Differential Reinforcement Procedures of Low Rates of Responding (DRL). In: Volkmar, F.R. (eds) Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1698-3_1905

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