Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders

2013 Edition
| Editors: Fred R. Volkmar

Environmental Engineering/Modifications

  • Christine BartholdEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1698-3_153

Definition

Environmental engineering/modification strategies, also known as antecedent interventions, are defined as changes to the immediate environment that allow the individual with ASD to process stimuli, predict future events, and respond appropriately. The purpose of environmental engineering strategies is to provide additional information about the appropriate and expected response in any given situation (Neitzel, 2009; Quill, 1995). They are considered proactive strategies to prevent problem behavior and increase appropriate behavior before correcting strategies are needed (Bregman, Zager, & Gerdtz, 2005).

There are a myriad of interventions that fall under the heading of environmental engineering. Such interventions include, but are not limited to, social stories and video modeling, functional communication training, consistent scheduling, choice, and organization, and visual supports. These interventions are often used to prevent problem behavior, but can also be used to...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Disabilities StudiesUniversity of DelawareNewarkUSA