Encyclopedia of the Sciences of Learning

2012 Edition
| Editors: Norbert M. Seel

Memory Persistence

  • Ivan IzquierdoEmail author
  • Jorge H. Medina
  • Martin Cammarota
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4419-1428-6_476

Synonyms

Theoretical Background

In the first 2–6 h after acquisition, learned information can be consolidated into long-term memories (LTMs) (McGaugh 2000; Izquierdo et al. 2006). This process is now known as cellular consolidation and takes place mainly in the hippocampus. During this process, LTMs are labile and the acquired information is available through short-term memory (STM) systems, which operate in parallel to consolidation (Izquierdo et al. 1998). Once consolidated, LTMs may last for just a few days or for several weeks, months, or years. Persistence depends in part on the degree of emotional arousal present at the time of consolidation (McGaugh 2000). It is well-known that memories involving a higher degree of emotional arousal are retained longer (we all remember where we were and whom we were with at the time of the assassination of President Kennedy or the 9/11 attack, but not the day...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ivan Izquierdo
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jorge H. Medina
    • 2
  • Martin Cammarota
    • 1
  1. 1.Memory Center, Brain InstitutePontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do SulPorto AlegreBrazil
  2. 2.Departamento de FisiologiaUniversidad de Buenos AiresBuenos AiresArgentina