Encyclopedia of Child Behavior and Development

2011 Edition
| Editors: Sam Goldstein, Jack A. Naglieri

Parent Management Training

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-79061-9_2079
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Synonyms

Definition

Parent management training (PMT) refers to an intervention program that trains parents to effectively manage their children’s behavioral problems [1]. It has been identified by the American Psychological Association (APA) Division 12 as a well-established, empirically-supported treatment method. PMT can be provided in home or school contexts and can be structured in groups or with individuals depending on the severity of the presenting problem. PMT is typically implemented with parents of children who display disruptive behavior problems.

Description

PMT is a traditional behavioral parent training approach that utilizes the parent as the main change agent to remediate the child’s externalizing behaviors. Externalizing behaviors in children constitute a variety of “acting out” behaviors and can range from minor oppositional behaviors including yelling, defiance and temper tantrums to...

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References

  1. 1.
    American Psychological Association. (1993). Task force on promotion and dissemination of psychological procedures. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Campbell, S., Shaw, D., & Gilliom, M. (2000). Early externalizing behavior problems: Toddlers and preschoolers at risk for later maladjustment. Development and Psychopathology, 12, 467–488.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Feldman, J., & Kazdin, A. E. (1995). Parent management training for oppositional and conduct problem children. The Clinical Psychologist, 48, 3–5.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Mash, E. J., & Barkley, R. A. (2006). Treatment of childhood disorders (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
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    Webster-Stratton, C. (1996). Early-onset conduct problems: Does gender make a difference? Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 64, 540–551.PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Webster-Stratton, C., & Hammond, M. (1998). Conduct problems and level of social competence in head start children: Prevalence, pervasiveness, and associated risk factors. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 1, 101–124.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Suggested Readings

  1. Kazdin, A. (2005). Parent management training: treatment for oppositional, aggressive, and antisocial behavior in children and adolescents. Oxford: Oxford Press.Google Scholar

Suggested Resources

  1. Center for effective parenting. www.parenting-ed.org
  2. The incredible years: Example parent management training program. www.incredibleyears.com
  3. American academy of child and adolescent psychiatry. http://www.aacap.org/
  4. Companion website for parent management training: treatment for oppositional, aggressive, and antisocial behavior in children and adolescents. http://www.oup.com/us/companion.websites/0195154290/ resources/?view=usa

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Educational Psychology and Special EducationMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA
  2. 2.Educational Psychology and Special EducationMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA