Computer Vision

2014 Edition
| Editors: Katsushi Ikeuchi

Gesture Recognition

  • Matthew Turk
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-31439-6_376

Synonyms

Definition

Vision-based gesture recognition is the process of recognizing meaningful human movements from image sequences that contain information useful in human-human interaction or human-computer interaction. This is distinguished from other forms of gesture recognition based on input from a computer mouse, pen or stylus, sensor-based gloves, touch screens, etc.

Background

Automatic image-based gesture recognition is an area of computer vision motivated by a range of application areas, including the analysis of human-human communication, sign language interpretation, human-robot interaction, multimodal human-computer interaction, and gaming. Human gesture has a long history of interdisciplinary study by psychologists, linguists, anthropologists, and others in the context of human communication [9], exploring the role of gesture in face-to-face conversation, universal and cultural aspects of gesture, the influence of gesture in human evolution...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew Turk
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science Department and Media Arts and Technology Graduate ProgramUniversity of CaliforniaSanta BarbaraUSA