Encyclopedia of Language and Education

2008 Edition
| Editors: Nancy H. Hornberger

Ecologies of New Literacies: Implications for Education

  • Karin Tusting
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-30424-3_240

Introduction

From e‐mails and word processing to blogs, podcasting and wikis, the possibilities afforded by new technologies have transformed the way we work, learn and live. Such ‘new literacies’ have offered a fertile field for research in recent years, and much of this research draws out particular implications of such changes for education. This article outlines the major work in this field to date, and considers possible future developments.

Lankshear and Knobel ( 2003) distinguish between ‘paradigmatic’ and ‘ontological’ senses of the term ‘new literacies’. By paradigmatic, they are referring to the ‘New Literacy Studies’ as a new paradigm in the approach to literacy, an approach which focuses on literacy practices in particular social, cultural and economic contexts (Barton, 1994; Gee, 2000; Street, 1984). By ontological, they refer to ‘changes [that] have occurred in the character and substance of literacies associated with changes in technology, institutions, media, the...

Keywords

Video Game Ecological Perspective Dominant Discourse Literacy Practice Digital Literacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karin Tusting
    • 1
  1. 1.Lancaster Literacy Research Centre, Institute for Advanced StudiesLancaster UniversityLancasterUK