Encyclopedia of Language and Education

Editors: Nancy H. Hornberger

National Sign Languages and Language Policies

  • Jan Branson
  • Don Miller
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-30424-3_12

Introduction

On 27 June 1999, 4,000 people marched through London in support of British Sign Language (BSL), demanding its recognition as the language of the British Deaf community and asserting the right of Deaf children to be educated in a bilingual environment with BSL as the language of instruction ( Deaf History Journal, 1999). While the British Deaf were marching, the Parliament of Thailand was in the process of formally recognizing Thai Sign Language as a fully fledged language, as the first language of Thai deaf people, and as the language through which Thai deaf people should be educated in a bilingual environment. By late March 2005, the British Deaf community were celebrating the fact that the government had recognized the existence of BSL 1but were fervent about the need to continue agitating to have BSL legalized so that BSL users have the legal right to use it, “bringing years of language discrimination to an end,” indeed for BSL to be recognized as “the UK's fourth...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jan Branson
    • 1
  • Don Miller
    • 2
  1. 1.National Institute for Deaf Studies & Sign Language ResearchLa Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.National Institute for Deaf Studies & Sign Language ResearchLa Trobe UniversityMelbourneAustralia