Encyclopedia of Diasporas

2005 Edition
| Editors: Melvin Ember, Carol R. Ember, Ian Skoggard

Music of the African Diaspora in the Americas

  • Donald R. Hill
Arts in Diasporas
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-29904-4_36

Introduction

For over 400 years the music of the African diaspora has reached to all the comers of the world. In the Americas (including the Caribbean) music from Africa has mixed with music from Iberia, Great Britain, and France. This entry exemplifies diasporic music by looking at a few styles and their cultural context before presenting a geographical overview of the major styles. For the purposes of this entry “African music” means music indigenous to the southern Sahel and to the south. Music of the “African diaspora” is restricted to African music that has spread to the Americas.

Instruments in Africana Music

The greatest variety of African instruments found in the Americas is in Cuba and Brazil. In both countries more recently arrived slaves, many of them Yorubas and Fons, infused local enslaved populations with their rituals, music, dance, and other customs. Older, creolized African instruments, such as the timbales criollos, thebanjo (originally more prevalent in North...

Keywords

Popular Music Tonal Language Musical Style African Diaspora Country Music 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald R. Hill

There are no affiliations available