Encyclopedia of Diasporas

2005 Edition
| Editors: Melvin Ember, Carol R. Ember, Ian Skoggard

Kurds in Finland

  • Östen Wahlbeck
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-29904-4_102

Alternative Names

There are no relevant alternative names.

Location

Finland is a republic in northern Europe, situated between Sweden, Norway, Russia, and Estonia. The country is a parliamentary democracy and has been a member of the European Union since 1995. The total population is 5.2 million. The majority of Finns live in the southern parts of the country; the north is sparsely populated. Finland is a highly developed welfare state with a high gross national product and low income differences, similar to neighboring Scandinavian countries.

History

Most of the Kurds in Finland arrived in the country in the 1990s, largely as a consequence of organized resettlement of Iraqi refugees under the auspices of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). There are also Kurds from Iran and Turkey living in the country, but refugees from Iraq make up the majority of the Kurds. By the turn of the millennium, the number of Kurds living in Finland was about 5,000 and growing.

Kurds...

Keywords

Asylum Seeker Turkish Immigrant Refugee Community Resettlement Program Refugee Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Östen Wahlbeck

There are no affiliations available