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Academic Problems

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Abstract:

Many school children have academic problems. We describe contemporary methods for assessing learning difficulties and properly identifying remediation strategies. Evidence-based treatment approaches include procedures for motivating student performance and eliminating conditions that are associated with academic failure. The chapter reviews basic clinician competencies such as conducting consultation with educational personnel, performing curriculum-based measurement, and implementing functional behavioral assessment. Our discussion about expert competencies centers on an understanding of the social influences on consultation, developing expertise in brief experimental analysis, and acquiring advanced skills through post-graduate education, professional activities (speaking, writing), and peer supervision.

Keywords

  • Reading Fluency
  • Special Education Service
  • Academic Problem
  • Academic Intervention
  • Behavior Analyst Certification Board

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Luiselli, J.K., Reed, D.D., Martens, B.K. (2010). Academic Problems. In: Thomas, J.C., Hersen, M. (eds) Handbook of Clinical Psychology Competencies. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-09757-2_61

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