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Pacific (Hawaiian) High

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The (North) Pacific (Hawaiian) High is a semipermanent cell of high pressure centered in the eastern Pacific from 35 to 45°N. It is one of the principal “centers of action” in the northern hemisphere, expanding in summer and contracting in winter.

As shown in Figure P1, the Pacific High has a July mean sealevel pressure of 1026 mb (30.3 in), analogous in pressure and dimensions to the Azores High, its Atlantic counterpart. The subtropical highs are one of the key elements of the Earth’s surface pressure. Their origin is not wholly understood, but it is believed that dynamic rather than direct thermal causes are foremost (Trewartha and Horne, 1980).

Figure P1
figure 3_1-4020-3266-8_156

Average sea-level pressure in July.

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Figure P1
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Cross-references

  1. Airmass Climatology

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  2. Atmospheric Circulation, Global

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  3. Centers of Action

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  4. Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

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© 2005 Springer

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Hordon, R.M. (2005). Pacific (Hawaiian) High. In: Oliver, J.E. (eds) Encyclopedia of World Climatology. Encyclopedia of Earth Sciences Series. Springer, Dordrecht . https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-3266-8_156

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