Encyclopedia of Operations Research and Management Science

2001 Edition
| Editors: Saul I. Gass, Carl M. Harris

Rand corporation

  • Gene H. Fisher
  • Warren E. Walker
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-0611-X_850

BACKGROUND

As World War II was ending, a number of individuals, both inside and outside the U.S. government, saw the need for retaining the services of scientists for government and military activities after the war's end. They would assist in military planning, with due attention to research and development. Accordingly, Project RAND was established in December 1945 under contract to the Douglas Aircraft Company. The first RAND report was published in May 1946. It dealt with the potential design, performance, and use of man-made satellites. In February 1948, the Chief of Staff of the Air Force approved the evolution of RAND into a nonprofit corporation, independent of the Douglas Company.

On November 1, 1948, the Project RAND contract was formally transferred from the Douglas Company to the RAND Corporation. The Articles of Incorporation set forth RAND's purpose:

“To further and promote scientific, educational, and charitable purposes, all for the public welfare and security of the...

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gene H. Fisher
    • 1
  • Warren E. Walker
    • 1
  1. 1.RAND Corporation,Santa MonicaUSA