Encyclopedia of Operations Research and Management Science

2001 Edition
| Editors: Saul I. Gass, Carl M. Harris

Fire models and applications

  • Bernard Levin
  • John R. HallJr.
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/1-4020-0611-X_343

SAFETY MODELING

Many individuals and organizations make decisions where fire safety is the principal, or at least a principal objective. This includes objectives of minimizing or reducing loss of life or property to fire. Much of the modeling used to support those decisions either is drawn from an operations research tradition or is used within a larger operations research framework.

For those who may not be aware that fire is a large enough problem to merit special attention, note that fire is a highly complex physical and chemical phenomenon that causes thousands of deaths and billions of dollars of loss annually (Karter, 1997). The estimated total cost of fire, combining the losses fire creates with the costs expended by society to prevent or minimize those losses, is on the order of $130 billion a year (Hall, 1998).

Operations research type modeling of fire safety decisions begins with more traditional hard-science modeling of the phenomena of fire that create a threat to safety. Fi...

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernard Levin
    • 1
  • John R. HallJr.
    • 2
  1. 1.RockvilleUSA
  2. 2.National Fire Protection AssociationQuincyUSA