Avoidance of Proteolysis in Extracts

  • Robert J. Beynon
  • Simon Oliver
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 244)

Abstract

Proteolytic enzymes (or proteases, peptidases, or proteinases) hydrolyze the peptide bond in proteins and peptides. The nomenclature is imprecise, but there is a broad acceptance that endopeptidases break bonds that are “internal” in the primary sequences, whereas exopeptidases trim one, two, or perhaps three amino acids from the amino or carboxy terminus of the substrate. Every cell and subcellular compartment has its own complement of proteolytic enzymes, and in normal circumstances, the activities of the proteolytic enzymes are well regulated. When a tissue is disrupted, however, this control is lost, and the proteinases may then attack proteins at a rate that leads to a loss of those proteins within the time scale of the study (1). Adventitious proteolysis is a technical problem that may require modification to methodology to minimize the assault on the protein of interest (2, 3, 4, 5).

Keywords

Proteolytic Activity Proteolytic Enzyme Proteolytic Degradation Aspartic Proteinase Iodoacetic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Beynon
    • 1
  • Simon Oliver
    • 2
  1. 1.Protein Function Group, Faculty of Veterinary ScienceUniversity of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry and Applied MicrobiologyUMISTManchesterUK

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