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Immobilization of Enzymes and Cells

Some Practical Considerations
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Biotechnology book series (MIBT, volume 1)

Abstract

The technology for immobilization of cells and enzymes evolved steadily for the first 25 years of its existence (1), but in recent years it has reached a plateau, if not a slight decline. However, the expansion of biotechnology, and the expected developments that will accrue from advances in genetic technology, has revitalized enthusiasm for immobilization of enzymes and cells (2). Research and development work has provided a bewildering array of support materials and methods for immobilization. Much of the expansion may be attributed to developments to provide specific improvements for a given application (3). Surprisingly, there have been few detailed and comprehensive comparative studies on immobilization methods and supports. Therefore, no ideal support material or method of immobilization has emerged to provide a standard for each type of immobilization. Selection of support material and method of immobilization is made by weighing the various characteristics and required features of the enzyme/cell application against the properties/limitations/characteristics of the combined immobilization/support. A number of practical aspects should be considered before embarking on experimental work to ensure that the final immobilized enzyme and/or cell preparation is fit for the planned purpose or application and will operate at optimum effectiveness (4, 5, 6). This chapter does not aim to provide a review of available methods, but does provide some background to assist in choice evaluation for support and method of immobilization.

Keywords

Enzyme Immobilization Support Material Covalent Binding Cyanogen Bromide Immobilization Method 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc , Totowa, NJ 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringUniversity of ArkansasFayetteville

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