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Methods for Assessing the Validity of Animal Models of Human Psychopathology

  • Paul Willner
Protocol
Part of the Neuromethods book series (NM, volume 18)

Abstract

Animal models are used very widely to investigate or illuminate aspects of human psychopathology. However, the extent to which it is possible to extrapolate from animals to people, and, therefore, the value of information derived from an animal model, will depend to a large extent on the validity of the model. This chapter outlines some methods that maybe used to assess the validity of an animal model of psychopathology. It must be emphasized that these methods are primarily conceptual: They concern ways of evaluating experimental data and weighing different sources of evidence. The methods described may be used prescriptively, to indicate where a data base stands in need of expansion, or to indicate critical experiments. However, the validation exercise is more usually applied to form a view of the adequacy of a model on the basis of existing data.

Keywords

Construct Validity Anorexia Nervosa Screen Test Predictive Validity Face Validity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Willner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCity of London PolytechnicLondonUK

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