Transfection of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

  • Brendan S. Crabb
  • Melanie Rug
  • Tim-Wolf Gilberger
  • Jennifer K. Thompson
  • Tony Triglia
  • Alexander G. Maier
  • Alan F. Cowman
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology™ book series (MIMB, volume 270)

Abstract

Methods to transiently and stably transfect blood stages of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum have been developed and adapted for gene-knockout, allelic replacement, and transgene expression in this organism. These methods are detailed in this chapter, as are approaches used to monitor transfectants during the selection process. The different plasmid vectors that are currently used for gene targeting and transgene expression (including green fluorescent protein expression) are also described.

Key Words

Allelic replacement DHFR GFP knockout malaria negative selection Plasmodium falciparum Rep20 selectable marker thymidine kinase transfection transgene expression 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa,NJ 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brendan S. Crabb
    • 1
  • Melanie Rug
    • 1
  • Tim-Wolf Gilberger
    • 1
  • Jennifer K. Thompson
    • 1
  • Tony Triglia
    • 1
  • Alexander G. Maier
    • 1
  • Alan F. Cowman
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Infection and ImmunityThe Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical ResearchVictoriaAustralia

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