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Lyophilization of Vaccines

Current Trends
  • Gerald D. J. Adams
Part of the Methods in Molecular Medicine™ book series (MIMM, volume 87)

Abstract

Regardless of how effective a vaccine may be in the laboratory, unless the suspension can be stabilized for storage and distribution, its commercial potential will be limited. Lyophilization (freeze-drying) is a well-established technique used in the pharmaceutical industry for stabilizing high-cost, labile bioproducts, such as vaccines. Alternative techniques that require the establishment of a cold chain can present problems, including the potential loss of vaccine stocks resulting from freezer failure and difficulties and costs when distributing frozen materials.

Keywords

Heat Annealing Sublimation Rate Molecular Conduction Shelf Temperature Collapse Temperature 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald D. J. Adams
    • 1
  1. 1.Gerald Adams ConsultancySalisburyUK

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