Biomembrane Protocols pp 211-218

Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 19) | Cite as

Analysis of Membrane Proteins by Western Blotting and Enhanced Chemiluminescence

  • Samantha J. Bradd
  • Michael J. Dunn

Abstract

The high resolution capacity of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) (seeChapter 19) has resulted in the widespread application of this group of techniques to protein separations. PAGE procedures can provide characterization of proteins in terms of their charge, size, relative hydrophobicity, and abundance. However, they provide no direct clues as to the identity or function of the separated components. A powerful approach to this problem is provided by probing the separated proteins with antibodies and other ligands specific for components of the protein mixture being analyzed.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samantha J. Bradd
    • 1
  • Michael J. Dunn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Cardiothoracic SurgeryNational Heart and Lung Institute, Heart Science CentreHarefieldUK

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