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An Assay for Human Chemosignals

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Pheromone Signaling

Part of the book series: Methods in Molecular Biology ((MIMB,volume 1068))

Abstract

Like all mammals, humans use chemosignals. Nevertheless, only few such chemosignals have been identified. Here we describe an experimental arrangement that casts a wide net for the possible chemosignaling functions of target molecules. This experimental arrangement can be used in concert with various methods for measuring the human behavioral and brain responses, including psychophysiology and brain imaging. Moreover, many of the methodological issues we describe are relevant to any study with human chemosignals.

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Acknowledgment

This work was supported by the James S. McDonnell Foundation.

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Frumin, I., Sobel, N. (2013). An Assay for Human Chemosignals. In: Touhara, K. (eds) Pheromone Signaling. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol 1068. Humana Press, Totowa, NJ. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-619-1_27

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-62703-619-1_27

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