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Measurement of Aldosterone in Blood

  • Sophie C. Barnes
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1065)

Abstract

This chapter describes the measurement of aldosterone concentration in plasma or serum. Aldosterone specificity is improved by first extracting the aldosterone into dichloromethane. A radioimmunoassay is then performed on the dried and reconstituted extract using an anti-aldosterone antibody and iodinated aldosterone. The antibody-bound fraction is separated from the unbound fraction using activated charcoal. The notes section provides extra information for steps in the assay that can be problematic.

Key words

Aldosterone Mineralocorticoid Solvent extraction Radioimmunoassay Dextran-coated charcoal 

Notes

Acknowledgments

With thanks to Mike Scanlon for his expertise and careful review of this and the renin activity chapter.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sophie C. Barnes
    • 1
  1. 1.Imperial College Healthcare NHS TrustCharing Cross HospitalLondonUK

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