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Commercial Considerations for Immunoproteomics

  • Scott M. Ferguson
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1061)

Abstract

The underlying drivers of scientific processes have been rapidly evolving, but the ever-present need for research funding is typically foremost amongst these. Successful laboratories are embracing this reality by making certain that their projects have commercial value right from the beginning of the project conception. Which factors to be considered for commercial success need to be well thought out and incorporated into a project plan with similar levels of detail as would be the technical elements. Specific examples of commercial outcomes in the field of Immunoproteomics are exemplified in this discussion.

Key words

Technology transfer Commercialization Intellectual property management Return on investment Innovation exploitation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Scott M. Ferguson
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Health Therapeutics PortfolioNational Research Council CanadaOttawaCanada

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