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An Overview of the Analysis of Next Generation Sequencing Data

  • Andreas Gogol-DöringEmail author
  • Wei Chen
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 802)

Abstract

Next generation sequencing is a common and versatile tool for biological and medical research. We describe the basic steps for analyzing next generation sequencing data, including quality checking and mapping to a reference genome. We also explain the further data analysis for three common applications of next generation sequencing: variant detection, RNA-seq, and ChIP-seq.

Key words

Next generation sequencing Read mapping Variant detection RNA-seq ChIP-seq 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology, Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular MedicineBerlinGermany

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