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Immunophenotyping of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  • Joseph A. DiGiuseppeEmail author
  • Jolene L. Cardinali
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 2032)

Abstract

Immunophenotyping by flow cytometry is an important component in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This technique further permits the detection of minimal residual disease after therapy, a robust prognostic factor that may guide individualized treatment. We describe here laboratory methods for both the initial characterization of lymphoblasts at diagnosis, and the detection of rare leukemic lymphoblasts after treatment. In addition to antibody combinations suitable for diagnosis and detection of minimal residual disease, we describe procedures for peripheral blood and bone marrow sample preparation, procedures for labeling of cell-surface and intracellular proteins with fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies, and approaches to analysis of immunophenotypic data.

Key words

Immunophenotyping Flow cytometry Acute lymphoblastic leukemia Minimal residual disease Antibodies 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors gratefully acknowledge Dr. Brent Wood, University of Washington, Seattle, for his generous gift of WoodList 2.7.8 software.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pathology and Laboratory MedicineHartford HospitalHartfordUSA

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