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An In Vitro Three-Dimensional Organotypic Model to Analyze Peripancreatic Fat Invasion in Pancreatic Cancer: A Culture System Based on Collagen Gel Embedding

  • Takashi Okumura
  • Kenoki Ohuchida
  • Masafumi Nakamura
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1882)

Abstract

Three-dimensional culture systems reflect biological environments better than conventional two-dimensional culture. Additionally, three-dimensional culture is a strong experimental tool to analyze direct interactions between cancer cells and stromal cells in vitro. Herein, we describe protocols for an organotypic fat invasion model that is a novel culturing system mimicking the extrapancreatic invasion of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This novel model is based on the collagen I gel embedding method and enables us to analyze the functional and histological interactions between cancer cells and adipose tissue.

Key words

Pancreatic cancer Extrapancreatic invasion Organotypic model Three-dimensional culture Cancer-associated adipocytes 

Notes

Acknowledgment

We thank James P. Mahaffey, PhD, from Edanz Group (www.edanzediting.com/ac) for editing a draft of this manuscript.

Grant support: This work was supported in part by Japan Society of Promoting of the Science (JSPS) Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) (Grant Number: 17H04284,16H05418).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takashi Okumura
    • 1
  • Kenoki Ohuchida
    • 1
  • Masafumi Nakamura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery and Oncology, Graduate School of Medical SciencesKyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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