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Programming Biomaterial Interactions Using Engineered Living Cells

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Synthetic Biology

Part of the book series: Methods in Molecular Biology ((MIMB,volume 1772))

Abstract

We have developed a biomaterials interface that allows the properties of a functionalized surface to be controlled by a population of genetically engineered bacteria. This interface was engineered by linking a genetically modified E. coli strain with a chemically functionalized surface. Critically, the E. coli was engineered to upregulate the production of biotin when induced by a small signaling molecule. This biotin would then interact with the functionalized surface to modulate the surface’s binding dynamics. In this chapter, we detail three protocols: one protocol for developing a population of biotin-producing genetically engineered cells, and two protocols for creating different types of functionalized surfaces. These methods will enable scientists to readily explore strategies for controlling surface-based material assembly and modification using a linked culture of engineered cells.

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Correspondence to Warren C. Ruder .

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Heyde, K.C., Ruder, W.C. (2018). Programming Biomaterial Interactions Using Engineered Living Cells. In: Braman, J. (eds) Synthetic Biology. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol 1772. Humana Press, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7795-6_14

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7795-6_14

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  • Publisher Name: Humana Press, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4939-7794-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4939-7795-6

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