The Colorectal Cancer Microenvironment: Strategies for Studying the Role of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts

  • Rahul Bhome
  • Massimiliano Mellone
  • Katherine Emo
  • Gareth J. Thomas
  • A. Emre Sayan
  • Alex H. Mirnezami
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1765)

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a key public health concern and the second highest cause of cancer related death in Western society. A dynamic interaction exists between CRC cells and the surrounding tumor microenvironment, which can stimulate not only the development of CRC, but its progression and metastasis, as well as the development of resistance to therapy. In this chapter, we focus on the role of fibroblasts within the CRC tumor microenvironment and describe some of the key methods for their study, as well as the evaluation of dynamic interactions within this biological ecosystem.

Key words

Colorectal cancer Tumor microenvironment Cancer-associated fibroblasts Extracellular vesicles 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by grant funding from Cancer Research UK.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rahul Bhome
    • 1
    • 2
  • Massimiliano Mellone
    • 1
  • Katherine Emo
    • 1
  • Gareth J. Thomas
    • 1
  • A. Emre Sayan
    • 1
  • Alex H. Mirnezami
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Cancer Research UK Centre, University of Southampton Cancer Sciences Division, Southampton University Hospital NHS TrustSouthamptonUK
  2. 2.University Department of SurgerySouthampton University Hospital NHS TrustSouthamptonUK

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